Sluglab Strikes Again – New paper tracing dynamics of learning-induced changes in transcription

A nice way to wrap up 2014–we have a new paper out [cite source=’pubmed’]25486125[/cite] where we trace learning-induced changes in transcription over time and over different location in the CNS. We think it’s a nice follow-up to the microarray paper, because:

  • We show that some transcriptional changes are likely occuring in interneurons and motor neurons, not just in the VC nociceptive sensory neurons.
  • We found some transcripts which, like Egr, are rapidly *and* persistently up-regulated by sensitization training (GlyT2, VPS36, and an uncharacterized protein known for now as LOC101862095). We’re interested in such transcripts because they could be related to memory maintenance
  • We were able to better test the notion that CREB supports memory maintenance. So far, our evidence continues to go against this hypothesis, with no long-lasting changes detected in the VC sensory neurons nor in the pedal ganglia.
  • As a methodological point, we found that microdissecting out the VC cluster really really improves signal:noise for identifying transcriptional changes induced by learning. This is exciting–most work on the molecular mechanisms of memory uses tissue samples representing homogenous cell types. Zooming in on a single cell type of known relevance for storing the memory really enhances the power of the analysis.
  • We re-rested the four novel transcripts identified in our microarray paper from earlier this year [cite source=’pubmed’]25117657[/cite]. All four validated again! Moreover, all 4 were specifically up-regulated in the VC nociceptors (and some elsewhere as well). Another good indication that we’re on the right track with our microarray approach.
  • Another 3 student co-authors on this paper! We’re especially proud of Sami, Catherine, and Saman.
  • The paper is free on PLOSE ONE: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0114481. Also, you can download our raw data to examine for yourself at the Open Science Framework: https://osf.io/ts9ea/.

    New Publication – Microarray analysis of sensitization

    We’ve got a new paper out [cite source=’pubmed’]25117657[/cite] with the first of what we hope will be a series of studies using microarray to track the transcriptional changes following long-term sensitization training. This paper looks at the changes that occur immediately (1 hour) after training. It provides lots of details and data to validate the microarray design we developed, but also identifies a set of 81 transcripts that are strongly regulated after learning. Best of all, for a microarray paper, we use a large sample size (n = 8) and show using a subset of transcripts that most generalize to a completely independent sample. Among the changes we fully validated are up-regulation of a c/ebp-gamma (what the what!?), a glycine transporter, and a subunit of ESCRTII. The rest of the gene list that we’re working on has some exciting possibilities, too.

    Another thing to be proud of, is our three student co-authors on the paper.

    The paper is free for the next 50 days via this link, then it goes behind a paywall for 305 days, then it will be in PubMedCentral for free again (strange, right?). All the raw data is available on the Open Science Framework: https://osf.io/8pgfh/.

    Travel award for Gerry Holmes!

    Congratulations, Gerry!  Junior DU student, bio major, and all-around Slug Lab superstar won a Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience Travel Award to attend this year’s Society for Neuroscience Meeting in San Diego, CA.  It was a competitive and international field, but Gerry nabbed one of these prestigious awards to present her ongoing work on the transcriptional mechanisms of long-term habituation.  Shown in the photo on the left is Gerry (left), Dr C-J (middle) and lab alumni Kristine Bonnick (right) who visisted the poster and the meeting from Loma Linda medical school where she is now enrolled.  In the photo on the right, Dr. Bob makes an appearance.  Go sluglab!

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