New Review Article: Transcriptional Mechanisms of Long-Term Sensitization

Psychologists and neuroscientists have long been fascinated by memory: how do we learn and carry with us new skills and memories? One key insight is that lasting memories require both transcriptional change and neural plasticity.

Much of what we know abou tthe links between transcription and memory has been revealed through the study of long-term sensitization in Aplysia.

The sluglab has a a new review paper reviwing what we’ve learned from Aplysia, summarizing the state of the art of how sensitization memories are induced, encoded, and maintained . You can check it out here: https://osf.io/preprints/osf/urxk2

This review was a lot of work — but also a lot of fun to work on. This is a topic we know well — it’s the main thing the sluglab has studied over the past 15 years. But it was still incredible (and overwhelming) to get a chance to sit down and intensely re-read the many amazing papers that have explored this topic. Pulling it all together was tough, but rewarding; we especially appreciated being able to carefully explain the evidence behind the synchronization model of the induction of sensitization memory that has emerged from recent empirical an computational work.

Writing this review re-newed our appreciation for the incredible work of Gary Philips, the lab of Jack Byrne, Eric Kandel, and the many other folks who have studied sensitization in Aplysia. It was a real honor to be asked to write about all this work; we hope we’ve done it justice.

Writing this review was also fun because Theresa Wilsterman (DU class of 2023) worked up some really amazing figures — nice work, Theresa, and congrats on graduating!

Oh – it was also fun to make a preprint of this review using Quarto and RStudio — it was easy to produce a really beautiful document.

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